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Tokyo has still a lot of historical places. If you have visited Tokyo few times in the past, this time you may …

Tokyo has still a lot of historical places. If you have visited Tokyo few times in the past, this time you may want to try some places where are popular among local people rather than those for tourists located in a tourist spot.

I would like to introduce the surrounding area of Shibamata Station in Katsushika-ku, around 45 minutes from Tokyo Station. The area is well-known for Japanese people as a site of a long-run movie called “Otoko-wa-tsuraiyo”. In fact, walking out of Shibamata Station, you are greeted by a bronze statue of the films’ hero, better known as Tora-san, who became the symbol of the district after director Yoji Yamada’s series grew into a long-running hit. After the first installment was released in 1969, 48 episodes of the series were created until 1995.

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Along the path from Shibatamata Station to Shibamata Taishakuten are a series of long-established Japanese-style sweet stores and souvenir shops.

Shibamata Taishakuten is known formally as Kyoeizan Daikyoji, this is a temple of the Nichiren sect of Buddhism with some 400 years of history. The principal image of the temple is Taishakuten, which is carved into a wooden board, and it is said to have benefited people suffering from illness in the past.

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The 200-meter-long main approach to the temple is lined with wooden shops selling local specialty kusa-dango, good-luck charms and mascots, as well as restaurants offering river fish dishes.

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Walking eastward down the street eastward, you reach the splendid Nitenmon Gate. Beyond that lies the temple’s main hall, whose walls are decked out with elaborate carvings.

Shibamata definitely stands out amid Tokyo’s constantly evolving cityscape, retaining an old-time feel. Interesting? Please check it out!

 

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