Members of the Gotemba Kyudo Association demonstrate Kyudo or "the way of archery."  
The Combined Arms Training Center Camp Fuji hosted Nov. 5 the 2006 Camp Fuji Martial Arts Expo, a gathering of Japanese cultural attractions with an emphasis on the martial arts, including demonstrations from 238 performers with 16 different groups and several static displays. The Shizoka Sports Association estimated the expo featured the widest variety of martial arts groups at a single event, according to expo organizers.  (Official U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Sgt. Ethan E. Rocke)(released).
Kyūdō is the Japanese martial art of archery. Experts in kyūdō are referred to as kyūdōka. Kyūdō is based on k …

Kyūdō is the Japanese martial art of archery. Experts in kyūdō are referred to as kyūdōka. Kyūdō is based on kyūjutsu, which originated with the samurai class of feudal Japan. Kyūdō is practiced by thousands of people worldwide.

The beginning of archery in Japan is pre-historical. The first images picturing the distinct Japanese asymmetrical longbow are from the Yayoi period (ca. 500 BC – 300 AD). The first written document describing Japanese archery is the Chinese chronicle Weishu (dated around 297 AD), which tells how in the Japanese isles people use “a wooden bow that is short from the bottom and long from the top.

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Kyūdō is practiced in different schools and styles and even between Dojos of the same style; the form of practice can vary.

Kyudo has some Zen-like principles; specifically, that the mindset is just as important as the techniques. The mind must be cleared of all other thoughts, and one must focus merely on getting everything correct—the posture, the steps, and shooting the arrow (with the first two even taking precedence over the latter). The logic is that once you concentrate on getting things right, shooting the arrow correctly will naturally follow. Kyudo, after all, is both a sport and an art. Some practitioners even place so much importance on the mental component that they do not participate in competitions, believing that those detract from the spirit of kyudo.

Members of the Gotemba Kyudo Association demonstrate Kyudo or "the way of archery."   The Combined Arms Training Center Camp Fuji hosted Nov. 5 the 2006 Camp Fuji Martial Arts Expo, a gathering of Japanese cultural attractions with an emphasis on the martial arts, including demonstrations from 238 performers with 16 different groups and several static displays. The Shizoka Sports Association estimated the expo featured the widest variety of martial arts groups at a single event, according to expo organizers.  (Official U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Sgt. Ethan E. Rocke)(released).

If you wanna try out this artistic culture Kyudo, you can easily try in Tokyo some of sports center such as Katsushika city sogo sports center.

The place is open on Wednesday from 18:30 to 21:00, so you can join even after your work (but you need special wear for Kyudo). Interesting? Please check it out!

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Station

Aoto

Open

18:30pm~21pm

Closed

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday