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Are you looking for some traditional sweets for your friends or family? It might be a good souvenir anyway! La …

Are you looking for some traditional sweets for your friends or family? It might be a good souvenir anyway! Lately there’s been a Japanese food boom around the world, and something that’s been attracting attention is wagashi, or traditional Japanese sweets. Wagashi have a history of more than a thousand years. Here I recommend you two shops for traditional sweets.

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1. Edo-Fu Okashitsukasa Nihonbashi Nagato

Edo-fu Okashitsukasa Nihonbashi Nagato, in Nihonbashi, is a well-established wagashi store that has about 300 years of history. They offer a huge variety of wagashi, and the most recommended among them are the Kuzumochi (890 JPY (incl. tax)) and their hannama-mochi (3,000 JPY (incl. tax) for the special small box), a type of wagashi with a water content of 10-30%. Their Kuzumochi is made with anko using kudzu starch and mochi made with bracken starch and then covered with lots of kinako (soybean) flour to create a chewy treat that melts-in-your-mouth. The hannama-wagashi can keep for a week, so it’s perfect for souvenirs. The cute box holds colorful, pretty wagashi so that you can enjoy various flavors and textures without getting tired of them. You can enjoy a luxurious tea-time with these sweets.

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2. Kuromatsu Main Branch Sogetsu.

In Tokyo, if you mention dorayaki, the first name on everyone’s lips is Kuromatsu’s main branch, Sogetsu, just down the hill from Higashi-Jujo Station’s south exit on the JR Keihin-Tohoku Line. Dorayaki is a wagashi made of two soft, round castella-like pancakes held together by anko. This store has been beloved by locals for more than 80 years, and offers a variety of wagashi including yokan (red bean jelly), monaka (a wafer filled with anko), dorayaki, and nama-wagashi (a type of wagashi that has a high moisture content and is usually made with anko). In their Kuromatsu Dorayaki (100 JPY (excl. tax)), they use lots of brown sugar, honey, and eggs to create a fluffy pancake that goes well with the high-quality sweet anko. The light aroma and gentle taste of the honey is extremely popular. It’s reasonably priced so many people buy it as souvenirs, and many people buy it almost every day. It usually sells out around 5:00 pm, so if you go to the shop, make sure to get there early.
Are you hungry? Interesting? Please check it out!

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